The long and winding road
Lilliputian Systems, MIT spin-out that raised $150 million, runs out of fuel
Former Lilliputian employees Mouli Ramani and Souren Lefian in the company's lab in 2011. Photo by Scott Kirsner for BetaBoston.
One of Boston's best-capitalized — and oldest — startups has run out of fuel thirteen years after it was founded. Lilliputian Systems, which had been developing a $300 system called Nectar that used butane to charge up portable electronics, has been selling off equipment and intellectual property, and plans to vacate its Wilmington office by September, CEO Sohail Khan tells me. That is after about $150 million of investment from venture capital firms that included Kleiner Perkins, Atlas Venture, Fairhaven Capital Partners, Stata Venture Partners, RockPort Capital, and Intel Capital. Intel had hoped to produce components of the Lilliputian system at its microchip factory in Hudson, which is being shuttered this year. Read More
Parking Wars
Boston City Council submits ordinance to put an end to parking apps, like Haystack
(DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE)
Earlier today, in a Boston City Council meeting that also tackled possible regulations for Uber, an ordinance was submitted by Boston City Councilor Frank Baker prohibiting, without permission from the City of Boston, the ability to "sell, lease, reserve, or facilitate the reserving of any street, way, highway, road or parkway, or portion thereof under the City of Boston's control." Read More
Entrepreneurial Man of Mystery
With 101 Tremont's Smartest Entrepreneur, Boston gets a better version of Banana Republic's Startup Guy
Image of Businessman with paper bag via Shutterstock
Last week, Banana Republic created some  (likely unwanted) buzz with the launch of its 'The Startup Guy' line of clothing. While the look is pretty much khakis rolled up a bit too high, t-shirts under fitted blazers, half tucked in shirts, and business dress shorts, for some reason, the disjunction between Startup Guy (and the ponderous models sporting the gear) and the reality of what people at startups actually wear on a daily basis led to ridicule and mockery for the marketing misfire. Read More
You come at the king ...
With its Pandora-for-dinner, Nara Logics building a future where search is less relevant
NARA Team
The current tech giants always seem unstoppable — up until it's too late. That's why I find the world of search so fascinating. Even as Google continues to reign more or less undisputed in typing what you want and getting it in a fraction of a second, others, including Cambridge-based Nara Logics, are hoping to cut a step out of that process. Read More
IPO implications?
HubSpot's head of product and VP of engineering will depart in September
HubSpot chief product officer David Cancel, in one of the Cambridge company's conference rooms. Photo by Scott Kirsner / BetaBoston.
Big news being announced this afternoon at HubSpot, the digital marketing startup widely regarded to be on the verge of an initial public offering: David Cancel, the Cambridge company's chief product officer, plans to leave in September, along with Elias Torres, an engineering vice president. The duo joined HubSpot in 2011, when HubSpot paid $20 million for their 20-person startup, Performable, in its biggest acquisition to date. Read More
Blink and it's gone
Home monitoring system Blink, surpasses goal, has raised close to $300,000 in a week on Kickstarter
Blink mobile app
Andover-based Immedia Semiconductor launched a Kickstarter campaign for Blink, an HD video monitoring and motion detector system, just last week. As of today, the company has raised close to $300,000 (far exceeding the original $200,000 goal) with more than 2,300 backers. Read More
Technology to bypass the sniff test
Like sound-cancelling headphones, kinda sorta, for odors
odor-cancel-FEATURE
If you know how noise-cancelling headphones work, you may have wondered whether the same kind of technical trick — producing your own vibrations that exactly cancel out the "noise" vibrations — might somehow work with smells. Twin-brother scientists Kush and Lav Varshney spent some time noodling on that notion. (Thanks to Martin Gardiner for telling me about the Varshneys.) Read More