Parking Wars
Boston City Council submits ordinance to put an end to parking apps, like Haystack
(DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE)
Earlier today, in a Boston City Council meeting that also tackled possible regulations for Uber, an ordinance was submitted by Boston City Councilor Frank Baker prohibiting, without permission from the City of Boston, the ability to "sell, lease, reserve, or facilitate the reserving of any street, way, highway, road or parkway, or portion thereof under the City of Boston's control." Read More
Entrepreneurial Man of Mystery
With 101 Tremont's Smartest Entrepreneur, Boston gets a better version of Banana Republic's Startup Guy
Image of Businessman with paper bag via Shutterstock
Last week, Banana Republic created some  (likely unwanted) buzz with the launch of its 'The Startup Guy' line of clothing. While the look is pretty much khakis rolled up a bit too high, t-shirts under fitted blazers, half tucked in shirts, and business dress shorts, for some reason, the disjunction between Startup Guy (and the ponderous models sporting the gear) and the reality of what people at startups actually wear on a daily basis led to ridicule and mockery for the marketing misfire. Read More
You come at the king ...
With its Pandora-for-dinner, Nara Logics building a future where search is less relevant
NARA Team
The current tech giants always seem unstoppable — up until it's too late. That's why I find the world of search so fascinating. Even as Google continues to reign more or less undisputed in typing what you want and getting it in a fraction of a second, others, including Cambridge-based Nara Logics, are hoping to cut a step out of that process. Read More
Kendall's Big Daddy
GoDaddy chief executive in town to open new office (and hit up Fenway)
GoDaddy CEO Blake Irving
GoDaddy is making a lot of news in Boston recently with last year's acquisition of MIT-born Locu and NameMedia "carve-out" Afternic, the acquihire move for Cambridge-based Techstars company Canary earlier this month, and a move to a new office overlooking the Charles in Kendall Square. Read More
IPO implications?
HubSpot's head of product and VP of engineering will depart in September
HubSpot chief product officer David Cancel, in one of the Cambridge company's conference rooms. Photo by Scott Kirsner / BetaBoston.
Big news being announced this afternoon at HubSpot, the digital marketing startup widely regarded to be on the verge of an initial public offering: David Cancel, the Cambridge company's chief product officer, plans to leave in September, along with Elias Torres, an engineering vice president. The duo joined HubSpot in 2011, when HubSpot paid $20 million for their 20-person startup, Performable, in its biggest acquisition to date. Read More
Blink and it's gone
Home monitoring system Blink, surpasses goal, has raised close to $300,000 in a week on Kickstarter
Blink mobile app
Andover-based Immedia Semiconductor launched a Kickstarter campaign for Blink, an HD video monitoring and motion detector system, just last week. As of today, the company has raised close to $300,000 (far exceeding the original $200,000 goal) with more than 2,300 backers. Read More
Technology to bypass the sniff test
Like sound-cancelling headphones, kinda sorta, for odors
odor-cancel-FEATURE
If you know how noise-cancelling headphones work, you may have wondered whether the same kind of technical trick — producing your own vibrations that exactly cancel out the "noise" vibrations — might somehow work with smells. Twin-brother scientists Kush and Lav Varshney spent some time noodling on that notion. (Thanks to Martin Gardiner for telling me about the Varshneys.) Read More
Lunch Time Testing
How Clover crunches big data to take aim at reshaping fast food
WEBB CHAPPEL
For a few years now, there's been one startup in Boston that's been my unqualified favorite to watch, even though I haven't reported on them: Clover Food. In a deep profile for this weekend's Globe Magazine, Eric Moskowitz rightly describes it as what would result if a cafeteria mated with an Apple store. But there's one big cultural difference between Apple and Clover: Clover is obsessively open with how it operates. Read More
What's Next for Online Education
What’s wrong with MOOCs and why aren’t they working?
(Image via Shutterstock)
Not too surprisingly, Boston has become one of the epicenters of the next would-be education revolution: Online learning. Spearheaded by EdX, which gained backing from Harvard and MIT, the city that hosts some hundred institutions of higher education is also trying to reform it. Harman Singh, the founder and chief executive of WizIQ, shares where he sees the field stumbling. Read More