Bad Hack
What you need to know about the celebrity photo hack
Image of "stealing data" via Shutterstock
Over the weekend, a whole bunch of private photographs, many of them featuring nude or semi-clothed celebrities, ended up finding their way to the Internet. And, after a day of outrage from many (and some expected immature joy from others) on Twitter, Reddit, and similar websites, the question of how images from some very private cloud accounts could be made public is taking a central position in the discussion. Read More
What stays in vegas
When casinos gather data, the customer also wins
(Shutterstock)
Personal data about customers is increasingly valuable to businesses, and casinos are among the most voracious data gatherers of them all. But unlike others, the gambling industry goes the extra mile to reward patrons for sharing their personal information. That’s one surprising lesson from “What Stays in Vegas,” a new book about how businesses everywhere—and the gambling and entertainment industry in particular—collect and use data about their customers.  Read More
AMA from Anywhere
Reddit woos mobile readers with new Ask Me Anything iPhone app
Reddit_AMA

Madonna, President Obama, and Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield, are part of a sparkling roster of luminaries who've personally answered questions from regular people on Reddit’s hugely popular Ask Me Anything channel. Today, Reddit launched a dedicated AMA mobile app with the goal of reaching even more readers. Read More

Masters of deception
Their machine will tell if you're friend or foe, they say
Veritas Scientific Corporation is — well, it must be — the rare company with technology that surpasses the limitations of what scientists understand. Veritas is all about deception. In the promotional video here, Veritas Scientific's founder and CEO Eric Fenn Elbot says that he "started reading incredible research about how to detect brain waves to detect deception, and how to use brain waves to go beyond that, to even, perhaps, be able to identify friend from foe." Therefore, he went into business. Read More
The third Hub
In Somerville, shuttered factory now a center of innovation
Employees at Keystone Tower Systems work on a piece of a wind turbine at Greentown Labs in Somerville. (Adam Boghosian for The Boston Globe)
The obituary of the Ames Safety Envelope Company was written in February 2010. The Somerville company had grown to about 600 employees in the mid-20th century, making sturdy envelopes, boxes, and file folders for medical records. But as the world started going digital, its business shrank, and eventually Ames was bought by a Wisconsin company rolling up similar manufacturers. Read More
I/O
Jeff Glass leaving Skyhook; Jim Crowley to be CEO
Jeff Glass (left) and Jim Crowley (right)
Boston tech veteran Jeff Glass is stepping down from his role as chief executive at wireless positioning innovator Skyhook Wireless. He will stay on as a member of the company's advisory board. In a company blog post, Skyhook also announced that Jim Crowley, who has been the president of Skyhook under Glass's tenure, will be stepping into the role of chief executive officer. Read More