Scott Kirsner
Scott Kirsner
Columnist
Scott Kirsner was part of the team that launched Boston.com in 1995, and has been writing a column for the Globe since 2000. His work has also appeared in Wired, Fast Company, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Boston Magazine, and Variety. Scott is the author of the books "Fans, Friends & Followers" and "Inventing the Movies," was the editor of "The Convergence Guide: Life Sciences in New England," and was a contributor to "The Good City: Writers Explore 21st Century Boston." He is a founder of the site Innovation Leader, which focuses on innovation initiatives inside big companies. Scott also helps organize several local events on entrepreneurship, including the Nantucket Conference and the Convergence Forum. His recent Boston Globe columns are here.

Stories by Scott Kirsner

Keeping score
Do you believe Massachusetts tech is major league?
littleleague
I have started to worry that instead of being in the press box for a Major League Baseball game, all of us who observe and cover the Boston tech scene are instead sitting in the aluminum bleachers of a Little League match that will end with a 24-19 score, and all of the players getting a trophy. Read More
An app for VIP access
Tablelist collects $1.5 million, with visions of becoming the OpenTable of after dark
tablelist
In his prior life as an real estate broker for international students in Boston, Julian Jung went to a lot of nightclubs and saw a lot of bottles of high-end liquor ordered. Jung says he has witnessed upwards of $15,000 spent in a single night in Boston, and has seen epic $50,000 evenings in New York. Read More
Eve's distant cousin?
Robot startup Jibo unveils a multi-purpose 'social bot' for the home
Jibo founder Cynthia Breazeal and software architect Jonathan Ross with a Jibo prototype. Photo by Scott Kirsner/BetaBoston.
Roomba hunts dust bunnies. Autom helps you shed pounds. But Jibo wants to be the first multi-purpose robot for your home — a countertop assistant that can snap family photos, remind you of the day's schedule, relay messages, entertain children with interactive stories, and facilitate videoconferences. The $499 product is being unveiled today, but won't be available until late in 2015. Read More
Have we got a deal for you...
Coming soon: Two more apps that will serve up location-specific offers
Screenshot from Epoque's website.
How many times have you heard this scenario pitched: You're walking down Newbury Street looking for lunch, when suddenly your phone chimes with a geographically-relevant offer. If you go just one block down, you can get 25 percent off lunch at a new French bistro (your favorite cuisine!) Read More
Hanging up the checkbook
With new CRV fund, long-time partner Bruce Sachs bows out
Bruce Sachs of Charles River Ventures.
Left unsaid in the announcement of the new $393 million fund raised by Charles River Ventures — oops, they're now called CRV — is that long-time partner Bruce Sachs is bowing out. Sachs still appears on CRV's website, but he confirmed to me this evening that he won't be involved in putting the new money to work. Sachs joined CRV in 1999 after a career in networking, and he was responsible for initially helping CRV put down stakes in California. Read More
Smarter stuff
Entrepreneur and Media Lab researcher David Rose talks 'enchanted objects'
EnchantedObjectsPoster-sm
New book out this week from serial entrepreneur and MIT Media Lab researcher David Rose, entitled, "Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things." Rose is doing two local events: one at Bolt on Tuesday night, and one on Thursday at the Harvard Book Store. We sat down a few days ago to talk about what exactly an "enchanted object" is. Read More
Department of glass ceilings
Not enough women in venture capital boardrooms: Bonus material
Miguel Montaner for The Boston Globe
Since it sprouted in Boston just after World War II, some things haven’t changed about the venture capital business: the desire for outsized returns, the constant hunt for promising startups, the framed documents celebrating stock offerings and acquisitions, and the long conference tables around which partners gather each Monday to debate which companies deserve money. Read More
Mr. Sulu goes to MIT
George Takei takes a spin through Boston's innovation scene
George Takei talks with Bill Warner, an angel investor and entrepreneur who founded Avid Technology.
When George Takei — social media star, equal rights crusader, and the former helmsman of the starship Enterprise — asks you about the most interesting places to visit to get a sense for innovation in Boston, that's an e-mail you respond to pretty fast. Takei was planning a trip here in May to shoot several new episodes of his YouTube series "Takei's Take," and I suggested he drop by places like Rethink Robotics, which sells a new kind of manufacturing robot, and Bluebird Bio, a Cambridge biotech developing new kinds of gene therapies for rare diseases. The first episode he shot on that trip just showed up on YouTube yesterday. Read More
New VC star?
Procyon Ventures, focusing on data and analytics, is newest venture firm in Cambridge
Procyon Ventures founder Millie Liu.
A new early-stage investment firm named after a star in the constellation Canis Minor has made a trio of investments since starting up earlier this year. I'd heard rumblings about the existence of Procyon Ventures a few months back, but didn't get founding partner Millie Liu on the phone until yesterday. Read More
Startups by the sea
Drydock is rocking... But here's what else it needs
An aerial view of Drydock Center, a/k/a the Bronstein Center, a/k/a the Innovation and Design Building (to the left of the gray ship), by David L. Ryan of the Boston Globe.
Drydock is rocking. Period. This summer, I think the massive complex on Boston Harbor has finally transitioned from being a destination of last resort for frugal startups who didn't want to pay the rents of Kendall Square or Fort Point to being a place companies actively choose. Read More