Virtual world
The virtual reality revolution arrives in Boston
Brian Ornstedt showed off a swiveling chair that connects into the Oculus and eliminates associated dizziness (Photo by Kyle Alspach)

It’s been about two decades since virtual reality arrived as a major area for technically-adept tinkerers to explore. They’re still tinkering. But it’s a different story now: The arrival of the Oculus Rift, and its $2 billion vote of confidence from Facebook, suggests that VR is finally on a path to the mainstream.

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The Incumbent vs. the Upstart
Is this week's parking app pilot decision a test of Mayor Walsh's bullish stance on innovation?
parking tickets
Last week, Mayor Martin J. Walsh came out and expressed his opposition to parking app Haystack's launch in Boston.  In his statement, the mayor said, "The Boston Transportation Department (“BTD”) welcomes innovation in all aspects of urban transportation, including the use of apps by smartphone users." Very soon, we will have a test case of just how serious the mayor is about innovation in Boston. Read More
Aereo responds
In my post yesterday on Aereo's slow growth (when the TV streaming service was still legal), I mentioned the size of the user base at Netflix—50 million—for context after citing Aereo's membership of 78,000 as of the end of last year. In response, Aereo SVP Virginia Lam sent along an article that shows Netflix had gradual growth early on as well—even after five years in business, Netflix had just 670,000 subscribers (in 2002). Though of course, those were the days when Netflix was only involved with mailing out DVDs. Discuss
Keeping score
Do you believe Massachusetts tech is major league?
littleleague
I have started to worry that instead of being in the press box for a Major League Baseball game, all of us who observe and cover the Boston tech scene are instead sitting in the aluminum bleachers of a Little League match that will end with a 24-19 score, and all of the players getting a trophy. Read More