Things change
Shake-up at LogMeIn's Xively division, focused on the 'Internet of Things'
(Globe photo / Essdras M. Suarez)
Several top execs focused on launching new services to support the "Internet of Things" — sometimes called machine-to-machine communication, or M2M — have left Boston-based LogMeIn in recent months. And LogMeIn is closing the London office of what had been Pachube, a startup it acquired in 2011. But a LogMeIn spokesperson tells me that the publicly-traded company is not shutting down Xively, its division that offers cloud-based software and services to help companies create and manage their own Internet of Things projects, like tracking the maintenance needs of factory equipment, or monitoring a fleet of trucks. Read More
What is Big Orange up to?
HubSpot: We're not trying to replace Salesforce, we want to be a Boston anchor company
HubSpot founders Dharmesh Shah and Brian Halligan (image via HubSpot)
Yesterday, HubSpot launched a new customer relationship management system, HubSpot CRM, and a new product, Sidekick, which it calls a sales acceleration product. Immediate reaction was that the inbound marketing company is going after the large market share of the current king of the CRM space, Salesforce. Read More
How many bottles of beer on the wall?
BevSpot banks $720,000 to help bars and restaurants better manage their booze
BevSpot co-founders Chidubem Ezekea, Alex Lesman, and Rory Crawford, outside the Harvard Innovation Lab.
2014 has been a pretty action-packed year thus far for BevSpot: founded in March by Harvard Business School and MIT students...raised $20,000 in early funding shortly after by the student-run Dorm Room Fund...product launch in August...and now, a $700,000 seed funding round. Read More