Music to your tongue
In a bid for more emotional snacking, Frito-Lay patents culinary theme songs
Innovation can be a matter of joining together things that the patent office — and maybe customers — will approve of. Corn chips, song, and the Internet are obvious influences on US patent 7942311, "Method for sequencing flavors with an auditory phrase," granted May 17, 2011 to George Eapen of Frisco, Texas. Eapen assigned rights to Frito-Lay, the corn chip behemoth. Read More
Outside Influence
Boston’s top VC dealmakers in Q2
(Shutterstock)

This week Charles River Ventures, now known as CRV, announced that its new fund would make Silicon Valley the priority, formalizing a shift westward that has been going on for a few years now.

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Foodie Delivery Service
Do we need another delivery app? Caviar aims to bring Boston's best food right to you
Image via Caviar
Oh to think back to the days of yore! If I was sitting on my couch watching the 2013 MLB All-Star Game and got a hankering for a burrito from Anna's Tacqueria, maybe a six pack of ice-cold Corona, or, for some reason, an order of "Pan Roasted New England Cod" from Stephi's on Tremont, I'd have to get my butt out the door and (I can't believe I'm typing this) actually go to a restaurant or store to fulfill my craving. Read More
We have liftoff
Dudley Square incubator Smarter in the City opens doors
smarter in the city
The moment that seemed like it might never arrive actually did. Smarter in the City, a business development program for high-tech startups in Dudley Square, opened its doors Wednesday in a second-floor space at 100 Warren Street. The launch followed difficulties raising money and securing sponsors, and doubts from others in Boston’s technology community about whether Dudley could be a viable location. Read More
Tapping entrepreneurialism
MIT spinout Sanergy targeting clean sanitation for all of Kenya (and beyond)
sanergy

While we fret over our first-world problems, there are nearly 2.5 billion people without access to something we’ve long taken for granted in the United States—adequate sanitation. And it’s a deadly problem: An estimated 1.6 million children die yearly from diarrheal disease as the result of inadequate sanitation.

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