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Facebook as a country
Mark Zuckerberg's $25 million donation is one of the largest to Ebola effort [Chart]
(MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan donated $25 million to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week. Channeled through the CDC Foundation, this donation will assist the CDC’s response to the outbreak. That's a little less than half the amount the duo reportedly spent purchasing 700 acres of Hawaiian Kauai, but this is still the fourth largest donation from a single entity to the Ebola effort to date. Read More
tech today
Three tech things: Egg-freezing at Apple and Facebook, password-killing wristbands, the smart lock that's disrupting keys
Smarlock-August
Everyone is talking about August's new "Smart Lock" device that lets you enter your house with your smartphone, and the reception is mixed. The good: It’s simple to install, you get notifications about who goes in and out. A bonus: The Smart Lock knows when you are close—geofencing!—and unlocks when you walk up to it. The bad: It doesn't always work. Read More
Social Commentary
An interview with danah boyd, author of 'It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens' (and drag queens)
Photo via <a href="http://www.danah.org/itscomplicated/">danah.org</a>
If you've read danah boyd's new book, "It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens" you'll understand just how complicated online privacy, identity, and the use of real names on Facebook can be. Boyd is a Research Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU, a Fellow at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and also a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research. Boyd is in Boston this week to deliver a keynote address at the Marketing Profs B2B Conference in Copley Square. I caught up with her and asked her a few questions about her new book and other issues surrounding online privacy. Read More
a fine line
Facebook reveals research guidelines after playing with users' feeds
(Shutterstock)
Back in 2012, researchers from Facebook and Cornell University altered the kinds of posts people saw in their Facebook feeds to study the way they responded to them. When Facebook users found out this year, they were mad. Now Facebook has responded, with its chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer publishing a response, laying out a set of guidelines by which research on Facebook will be conducted in the future. Read More
Putting up walls
Facebook apologizes to drag queens, but politics of online identity and privacy persist
shutterstock_mask
Two weeks ago, Facebook began suspending the accounts of members of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, a drag and community service organization. Members who'd been active on Facebook under their stage names were locked out until they registered with their legal names. For those members who wanted to keep their stage identities separate from the rest of their lives, at least online, Facebook's actions threatened to tear down a critical wall of privacy. After attempted discussions with Facebook, a whole lot of media (and social media) attention, and a Change.org campaign that's collected more than 36,300 signatures, on Wednesday Facebook's chief product officer Chris Cox apologized to the group. Read More
Ello....Ello?
Heard of Ello? You may want to join this 'anti-Facebook' soon
Ello copy
Since Facebook announced a new policy trying to make people use their real name on the social network, there has been quite a blowback from people like musicians, artists, and members of the LGBT community who use pseudonyms on the site for artistic purposes or to protect their real identities. One company is reaping the benefits of Facebook's "real name" stance and making a name for itself in the process. A social network called Ello, with some New England roots, has generated a ton of buzz over the past few days as people have inundated the site with invitation requests. The descriptor some are giving to the site: the "anti-Facebook." Read More