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Generation Snapchat
WiGo secures funding from Tinder founders, launches 'history-proof' text resetting feature
Photo via <a href="http://www.boston.com/thingstodo/gotoit/2011/07/toga_party_phot.html">Boston.com</a>
If there's one population of people who might like to forget some of the text messages they've sent in the past (possibly after a big booze-fueled night out), it's college kids. And another set of people who would like to see some past messages disappear? The guys who played a role in founding Tinder, Sean Rad and Justin Mateen, who drew heat earlier this year for their inappropriate text messages. Today, Rad and Mateen are being held up as prominent investors in the seed round of funding for the Boston-based WiGo, which stands for Who Is Going Out? The app was designed for college campuses and allows users to connect for social engagements and share what they are up to, and specifically where they are, on any given night out.  Read More
Facebook as a country
Mark Zuckerberg's $25 million donation is one of the largest to Ebola effort [Chart]
(MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan donated $25 million to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week. Channeled through the CDC Foundation, this donation will assist the CDC’s response to the outbreak. That's a little less than half the amount the duo reportedly spent purchasing 700 acres of Hawaiian Kauai, but this is still the fourth largest donation from a single entity to the Ebola effort to date. Read More
tech today
Three tech things: Egg-freezing at Apple and Facebook, password-killing wristbands, the smart lock that's disrupting keys
Smarlock-August
Everyone is talking about August's new "Smart Lock" device that lets you enter your house with your smartphone, and the reception is mixed. The good: It’s simple to install, you get notifications about who goes in and out. A bonus: The Smart Lock knows when you are close—geofencing!—and unlocks when you walk up to it. The bad: It doesn't always work. Read More
Social Commentary
An interview with danah boyd, author of 'It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens' (and drag queens)
Photo via <a href="http://www.danah.org/itscomplicated/">danah.org</a>
If you've read danah boyd's new book, "It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens" you'll understand just how complicated online privacy, identity, and the use of real names on Facebook can be. Boyd is a Research Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU, a Fellow at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and also a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research. Boyd is in Boston this week to deliver a keynote address at the Marketing Profs B2B Conference in Copley Square. I caught up with her and asked her a few questions about her new book and other issues surrounding online privacy. Read More