Kayak

4 stories
Innovation Economy
Trolling campuses for the next Facebook
(From left) Barron Roth, John Moore, middle and Luke Sorensen discuss Downtyme during a development meeting at Boston University. (Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff)
Two April days, separated by a decade. Two college sophomores walk into the Charles Square complex in Cambridge to meet with prospective investors. They’ve both built apps to help students communicate with friends on campus, and attracted a small community of users. Read More
Kayak crew's next trick
First look: Blade Network, a supercollider for Boston's startup scene
Blade co-founders Paul Schwenk, Bill O'Donnell, and Paul English, all of whom previously worked together at Kayak, Intuit, and Interleaf.
The big opening party for Paul English's Blade Network startup space is tomorrow night, and when I dropped by on Monday morning, construction crews were scrambling to get everything finished. English, the co-founder and former chief technology officer at Kayak, wants it to become a supercollider for consumer tech, art, and music in Boston. And in terms of designing a dazzling environment, he's definitely aiming high. Read More
New venture factory Blade adds veterans of Zappos, iRobot, Cisco
englishpaulm
The team has been expanding over at Blade, the startup factory in Fort Point Channel that doesn't officially open its doors until later this month. Blade's founding trio all came from Kayak, the travel-planning site that has its technology operations in Concord, but they've recently been adding veterans of iRobot, Millennial Media, Cisco, and Zappos. Read More
April is the Cruellest Month
Kayak for Toilets? Runkeeper from Southie? Boston tech takes on April Fools' Day
iStockphoto
T.S. Eliot famously began one of his most famous poems, The Wasteland, with the lines, "April is the cruellest month..." referring to the emotional weight of the life/death cycle as winter morphs into spring. Today, April 1, can also be a bit cruel to many unsuspecting and unwary media types and Internet talking heads who often fall for the outrageous pranks of tech companies on what is becoming a bit of tech national holiday, April Fools' Day. Read More