Manchester NH

7 stories
A new Innovation District tenant?
Autodesk to open space in downtown Boston, acquires Terrible Labs, funds Robin
Photo via Autodesk

In a move that has all the makings of staking a flag in the ground, Autodesk, a maker of design software for architecture, engineering, manufacturing, and 3-D printing has shared plans that it will open a significant new workspace in downtown Boston.

It is also acquiring local mobile and Web app development shop Terrible Labs and will back Robin, a Boston-based startup working to help create a “smarter office.” Read More

Data Integrate in the Granite State
After two decades in business, New Hampshire's Scribe has found its opportunity on the cloud
<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-181612733/stock-photo-finger-touching-and-make-the-glow-line-on-pcb.html?src=Dt00BFKD4qWJWm4ZM1yphA-1-8">"Finger touching glow line" via Shutterstock</a>
Most discussions about technology and startups north of the Massachusetts border tend to focus on Dyn, Dean Kamen, and, sometimes, Mosaic and DataGravity. However, another New Hampshire business, Manchester-based data integration company Scribe Software, may need to start being included in the discussion. Read More
Laid back like a tiger
King of the North - Dyn's Jeremy Hitchcock is building the pillar company of New England
Jeremy Hitchcock (image via Dyn)
Sitting on the sun-soaked deck of Manchester, N.H.-based Dyn, the company he founded in 2001, Jeremy Hitchcock not only seems completely happy, at home, and at ease, he exudes a confidence, lacking any trace of cockiness, that most chief executives lack in spades. It must be the New Hampshire ethos; that hard-working, grind it out mentality that is also coupled with a joie de vivre that courses through the Lakes and Seacoast in summer and the White Mountains in winter. Read More
Hacking New Hampshire
Students gain first-hand tech experience at Dyn's Hackademy weekend
Dyn Hackademy (Photo credit: Katlyn O'Hara)
Contributed piece from Ali Rafieymehr, of Manchester, New Hampshire-based Dyn, on a recent program to give local college students hand-on tech experience. The tech industry has a unique crisis on its hands. While more and more startups are popping up across the United States, the number of qualified students fit for those jobs is decreasing. Computer science student participation at the high school level is decreasing. Read More