MIT

102 stories
A sensor you can swallow
Google's quiet partner on cancer-detection project: Mass.-based Entrega
Entrega board members Robert Langer, Jonathan Behr, and Colin Gardner. (Globe Photo / Jim Davis.)
Earlier in the week, Google took the wraps off an intriguing project that is part of its secretive Google X skunkworks: a magnetic nanoparticle that would travel through the bloodstream searching for early signs of cancer. But what Google executive Andrew Conrad didn't mention is that a Boston-area startup, Entrega Inc., is working with his company to actually deliver the nanoparticles, using a novel kind of pill. Read More
Harvard's SLIPS technology solves sticky situations
Image: Wyss Institute
A surprising number of the world's problems arise because of stuff sticking to other stuff: Ice on airplane wings, barnacles growing on undersea power lines, blood sticking to blood bags. A new company launched out of Harvard University hopes they've found a solution. Their creation? A suite of ultra-slippery surfaces that repel blood, bacteria, dust, water, ice, cement, and more. Read More
Superconnector
Meet the woman who connects MIT's software smarties with their futures
MIT administrator Anne Hunter (center) in 2012, with MIT students Irena Huang (left) and Elaina Chai (right.)  Photo by Patricia Sampson, MIT.
Over the past decade and a half, I've heard MIT students and grads regularly mention something called the "Anne Hunter list" — sometimes referred to more generically as "the jobs list." It's how they land jobs at Google and Dropbox, or at startups that will become the next Google or Dropbox. It's also how they score free pizza and t-shirts at company recruiting events on campus. So I started to wonder: exactly who was this Anne Hunter? Read More
HVAC for your hand
Meet the MIT startup that’s building the Nest for your wrist
A prototype of the thermoelectric bracelet built by Embr Labs.
Legions of office workers struggle daily with the Goldilocks problem: Their workspace is too hot. Their workspace is too cold. It's never just right. Embr Labs, a startup spun out of MIT, hopes to make the average worker ant more comfortable in their cubicle. Their solution is a “thermoelectric bracelet” called the Wristify that straps onto your wrist and heats your skin.  Read More
Delicious deal
Phoodeez catering raises $600k, led by Project 11
Phoodeez caters large-scale corporate functions and small-scale luncheons by supplying food from multiple local restaurants. Workers at Litmus, an e-mail analytics firm in Boston, enjoyed a Phoodeez lunch in July.
Katie Rae was at an MIT conference when a familiar thought crept into her head: “How quickly can I duck out of this boxed lunch and go get real food?” “But I peeked into the box and said, ‘Wow, this actually looks good,’ ” she recalled. “That was my introduction to Phoodeez.” Now Rae’s venture capital firm, Project 11, is leading a $600,000 investment round in Phoodeez, a Boston startup that caters corporate functions by supplying food from multiple local restaurants that specialize in different types of cuisine. Read More
cutting edge
'Descience' fashion show at MIT displays the glamorous side of science
descience-small
Glowing LEDS, geometric silks, 3-D-printed headdresses, and cage-like bras were on display at a science-themed fashion show at the MIT Media Lab this week, each a daring blend of science and style. The garments were the product of a mind-meld between teams of scientists and designers from across the world, as part of the first-ever Descience contest. Read More
Learning machines
MIT online course will teach you to design a robot that moves
Credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
Walking, jumping, running robots like Big Dog and Atlas are equal parts amazing and terrifying. And look how they've grown: MIT's Cheetah bot, once a tethered machine on a treadmill, can now bound across an open field unchained. A few makers of the sophisticated moving robots that are starting to pop up in public more and more are going to be sharing their wisdom with the masses. Starting today, MIT's online course on moving robots is open for business. Read More