MIT

107 stories
Now you see it
Magic materials fold themselves at MIT exhibition this month
Textile_02
Time is the fourth dimension. That's the first thing you need to know before you enter the 3-D/4-D exhibition that opened this week at an MIT gallery this week. Sheets of wood, metal and cloth that are 3-D printed into fantastic structures are on display at the Keller Gallery on campus, but the real twist is this: They are programmed to shape-shift over time. Read More
New Angels
Angel Boot Camp: The Peace Corps for millionaires
Image via <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-196122302/stock-vector-businessman-flying-freedom.html?src=pp-same_artist-224791360-0SOeekusz_q2xh1SZW0H8Q-2">Shutterstock</a>
If you missed the Angel Boot Camp at MIT’s Tang Center the other day, you missed a lot. Organizers Jon Pierce, Rob Go, and Jay Acunzo put together an amazing lineup of angel investors and brilliant startup savants. Read More
RIP
Watch: NPR's Click and Clack give the commencement address at MIT's 1999 graduation
Photo: WBUR
Thomas Magliozzi, the beloved co-host of NPR's "Car Talk," died yesterday at the age of 77. For the 35 years that he and his brother, Ray, hosted the program, the pair played down their intellect in the hopes of coming off as regular guys. But they were no mere mechanics: the brothers had both received degrees from MIT (Tom in 1958, and Ray in 1972) and in 1999, they were invited to give the commencement address to campus. Read More
A sensor you can swallow
Google's quiet partner on cancer-detection project: Mass.-based Entrega
Entrega board members Robert Langer, Jonathan Behr, and Colin Gardner. (Globe Photo / Jim Davis.)
Earlier in the week, Google took the wraps off an intriguing project that is part of its secretive Google X skunkworks: a magnetic nanoparticle that would travel through the bloodstream searching for early signs of cancer. But what Google executive Andrew Conrad didn't mention is that a Boston-area startup, Entrega Inc., is working with his company to actually deliver the nanoparticles, using a novel kind of pill. Read More
Harvard's SLIPS technology solves sticky situations
Image: Wyss Institute
A surprising number of the world's problems arise because of stuff sticking to other stuff: Ice on airplane wings, barnacles growing on undersea power lines, blood sticking to blood bags. A new company launched out of Harvard University hopes they've found a solution. Their creation? A suite of ultra-slippery surfaces that repel blood, bacteria, dust, water, ice, cement, and more. Read More
Superconnector
Meet the woman who connects MIT's software smarties with their futures
MIT administrator Anne Hunter (center) in 2012, with MIT students Irena Huang (left) and Elaina Chai (right.)  Photo by Patricia Sampson, MIT.
Over the past decade and a half, I've heard MIT students and grads regularly mention something called the "Anne Hunter list" — sometimes referred to more generically as "the jobs list." It's how they land jobs at Google and Dropbox, or at startups that will become the next Google or Dropbox. It's also how they score free pizza and t-shirts at company recruiting events on campus. So I started to wonder: exactly who was this Anne Hunter? Read More