MIT

119 stories
too hot to handle
Remember that time Mayor Curley asked MIT for flamethrowers to melt the snow?
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The year 1948 was a bit of a doozy in terms of snowfall in the Commonwealth, with record-setting numbers logged after several storms. But after the city of Boston was pummeled with 89.2 inches, Mayor James Curley sent a letter to the president of MIT asking for help. Would the Institute please ready a flame-throwing apparatus to get rid of the stuff when it melted? Read More
Innovation Economy
Reebok, others have technology to help prevent concussions, but few sports adopt it
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Ben Harvatine couldn’t point to a single time that his head slammed hard against the wrestling mat. He just felt progressively worse over the course of a practice at MIT. “I’d had concussions before, but this one felt really different,” Harvatine says. “I couldn’t talk right, and was having trouble walking. But like every athlete, you find ways to rationalize it — maybe you’re just dehydrated.” Read More
Spy vs. Spy
President Obama, David Cameron announce 'Cambridge v. Cambridge' hackathon
President Obama and UK Prime Minister David Cameron at a news conference at the East Room of the White House Jan. 16. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
President Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron announced a hackathon on Friday that is panning out to be the great cybersecurity smackdown of 2015. The pair are pitting wonks and nerds on either side of the Atlantic against each other in a battle called "Cambridge v. Cambridge."  Read More
Are you blond, female, and feeling like you don't fit in at MIT? You're not alone.
Anna Loparev, of Wellesley College, at the GAMBIT lab at MIT. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff/File photo)
What’s it like being a conventionally attractive woman at one of the world’s most competitive tech schools? “Sometimes I feel as if in saying that I attend MIT, I’m telling a blonde joke,” reports Alice Zielinski, an aeronautics and astronautics major at the institute, in a blog post published on Medium last week.  Read More
Boston startups show off the future of 3-D printing at CES
Samples of objects printed by MarkForged at CES this week.
The floor space dedicated to 3-D printers at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is growing faster than waistlines at the nearby casino buffets. Just a year or two ago, a handful of players took up a few tiny booths at the back of the Las Vegas Convention Center; today the sector is booming, and printer manufacturers have a whole section of the South Hall to themselves. Read More
Better, faster, stronger
Woods Hole to receive $5 million to build better underwater robots
No one lives in this yellow submarine -- Sentry is just a companion robot that sometimes joins Alvin, the human-occupied submersible (painted red) on expeditions. (Photo: WHOI)
The Bay State has a soft spot for underwater robots. On Friday, Massachusetts officials gathered at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to announce a $5 million grant that will expand the center's robotics research facility over the next five years. The grant will fund new test tanks, a pressure testing space for deep sea robots, and a fabrication shop with a desktop 3-D printer for prototyping parts for new machines at WHOI's Center for Marine Robotics. Read More
No love for Bluetooth bracelet
Connected jewelry startup Magnet will head west to try to raise money
Alexander List's startup HeadTalk IO is a member of TechStars Boston.
Magnet co-founder and CEO Alexander List is moving to San Francisco to try to raise money for the startup, which was part of the most recent class of the Techstars Boston entrepreneurship program. The company, previously known as Headtalk IO, had been running a Kickstarter campaign that sought to raise $60,000 to produce the first batch of Magnet bracelets. But the startup hadn't hit that goal by the time the clock ran out last week — which in Kickstarter-land means no dough. Read More
Global Good
MIT and the shortcut to Nirvana
A team from MIT visits a Kumbh site. Photo via Ramesh Raskar.
It is the largest religious gathering on earth. The colorful and chaotic Kumbh Mela, (Kumbh, for short), a triennial event hosted by one of India’s four second-tier cities, draws devotees by the millions. Now, thanks to Ramesh Raskar, a MIT Media Lab professor whose hometown, Nashik, is the venue for upcoming Kumbh, it has drawn tech-minded folks from Boston as well. Read More