Social Media

28 stories
Q&A
Talking tweets with Guy Kawasaki
Guy Kawasaki discusses his new book, The Art of Social Media. Photo: Halley Suitt Tucker.
Guy Kawasaki first rose to fame as Apple’s chief evangelist in the early era of the Mac, but today he’s best known for his commanding social media presence. Every day, he provides hundreds of insightful links to his 1.4 million Twitter followers. Kawasaki is the co-author of the new book, “The Art of Social Media, Power Tips for Power Users” (Portfolio/Penguin), with the New Hampshire-based social media strategist Peg Fitzpatrick, who plans and assists with much of his online presence. Here, he shares his insights on mastering communications on the Web. Read More
More proper channels
Fighting back: Women now have a tool to report their abusers on Twitter
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Women, famously, are not welcome on the Internet, and it is on public forums like Twitter where they typically face the shrillest abuse. Now, women have a place to report their harassers thanks to a new tool built by Women, Action & the Media, a Cambridge group that is collaborating with Twitter.  Read More
To track a killer
HealthMap tracks Ebola’s footprints online, preparing for the next big outbreak
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Since March, a group of data-savvy epidemiologists at Boston Children’s Hospital have watched Ebola slowly spread through West Africa, ominously lighting up their dials first as a trickle, then a torrent of mentions on social media and online news reports. The group, HealthMap, has been steadily ahead of the curve tracking this year’s outbreak. One day, they hope to be a step ahead of the next big disease. Read More
a fine line
Facebook reveals research guidelines after playing with users' feeds
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Back in 2012, researchers from Facebook and Cornell University altered the kinds of posts people saw in their Facebook feeds to study the way they responded to them. When Facebook users found out this year, they were mad. Now Facebook has responded, with its chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer publishing a response, laying out a set of guidelines by which research on Facebook will be conducted in the future. Read More
Putting up walls
Facebook apologizes to drag queens, but politics of online identity and privacy persist
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Two weeks ago, Facebook began suspending the accounts of members of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, a drag and community service organization. Members who'd been active on Facebook under their stage names were locked out until they registered with their legal names. For those members who wanted to keep their stage identities separate from the rest of their lives, at least online, Facebook's actions threatened to tear down a critical wall of privacy. After attempted discussions with Facebook, a whole lot of media (and social media) attention, and a Change.org campaign that's collected more than 36,300 signatures, on Wednesday Facebook's chief product officer Chris Cox apologized to the group. Read More